China Shanghai Travel and Tour

The city of Shanghai is the biggest commercial and financial center in China and also one of the most important international port city in the western-pacific region. The city of Shanghai, bordering on Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces in the west, is washed by the East China Sea in the east and Hangzhou Bay in the south. North of the city, the Yangtze River pours into the East China Sea. At the central point along China’s coastal line, Shanghai has ready transportation facilities. Thanks to its advantageous geographic location, Shanghai has both excellent sea and river ports and a vast hinterland.

With a pleasant northern subtropical maritime monsoon climate, Shanghai enjoys four distinct seasons, with generous sunshine and abundant rainfall. Its spring and autumn are relatively short comparing with the summer and winter. However, nearly 50 percent of the precipitation came during the May-September flooding season, which is divided into three rainy periods, namely, the Spring Rains, the Plum Rains and the Autumn Rains.  

As a city of a long history, Shanghai has 13 historical sites under state protection, including characteristic gardens built during the Tang, Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties. A group of architectures built since the 1990s have added something new to the scenic attractions of the city. The Oriental Pearl TV tower, the No. 1 skyscraper in China and the People’s Square well fit into the urban landscape and compete with the Western-style architectures built along the bunds. Being one of the earliest city to underwent economic reform, Shanghai has a large expatriate community and foreign businesses, more so than the capital of Beijing.

Copyright @ eChinaExpat.com

Kuala Lumpur Travel Tip – Series 3 (Weird Food)

Malaysia has many weird food (weird even to some locals) to offer, and most of them can easily be found in Kuala Lumpur. However, each state in Malaysia offers its own special delicacy. For example, budu in Kelantan, keropok lekor in Terengganu, cencaluk in Melaka. However, all of them are easily found in Kuala Lumpur. Be sure to treat yourself with these :

Petai – Green beens from the deep jungle, which some people say smell like methane gas. Its popularly cooked in sambal tumis ikan bilis – which is fried chili with anchovies. However, locals absolutely love them eaten raw as ulams (almost equal to the western salad). Petai is also enjoyable grilled or boiled. A typical dipping with petai is sambal (chili paste), budu (a fish sauce) and tempoyak (a paste made from durian). Budu and tempoyak themselves are also considered ‘weird’ food.

Durian – A fruit as big as a football, covered with tough spiky skin. The pulp is pale yellow, with shape and consistency of raw brains. Smell has been compared to rotting flesh, old gym socks, or sewage. Yet the taste has been called so exquisite that a European explorer of the 1700’s claimed it was worth the journey to experience it; “the King of fruits.” Many believe it aphrodisiac and hold durian-eating parties. Most hotels, and so on, forbid it on the premises.

Keropok Lekor – Its not what you think it is. Its actually fish sausages, normally deep fried and dipped in a sweet chili sauce (tastes almost like plum sauce). The best keropok lekor you can find is available in the state of Terengganu (where many fishing villages are). Fresh caught fish are brought to roadside stalls, where the fish are deboned, cooked and made into fresh keropok lekor you can ever find, made right in front of your eyes.

Otak-otak – Brains anyone? Otak literally means brain. But otak-otak has nothing to do with it. Otak-otak is made by pounding fresh fish into a paste, and mixing it with chilies, coconut milk, and spices, then wrapping the whole thing in a banana leaf and grilling it. When the banana leaf chars, the fish is read to eat.

Some are unique, but not so horrible looking. Make sure you try these:
Lai Chee Kang, ABC (Air Batu Campur/ Mixed Ice), Longan drink, Karipap (curry puffs), cendol (colorful goodies made from starch eaten in cold coconut milk mixed with dark sugar), tapai, pulut, popia, roti canai, the tarik (literally means – pull tea), char kuey teow, and so many others.

Enjoy!

Ease The Stress Of Travel With Bach Flower Remedies

They say that travel broadens the mind. It also empties your wallet and is rarely straightforward! My teenage son is off to Honduras on a scientific expedition in a couple of days. The planning that has gone into this trip has been like a military operation. Lists litter my desk – essential equipment, medical kit, dive gear, jungle clothes, currency, travel documents, flight details and more. There have been times when my mind has been on a loop with these lists. I’ve woken in the middle of the night thinking about the things that we may have missed and have been distracted during the day with this trip on my mind.

Luckily, I know that there is a solution for worrying thoughts. White Chestnut, one of the 38 remedies that make up Dr Edward Bach’s system of healing, is designed to deal with exactly this kind of worry. I took 2 drops in a glass of water which I sipped throughout the day and in a few days my mind was clear. Once again, I was able to control my thinking, instead of it running itself like a hamster on a wheel!

There are many other Bach Flower Remedies that help with travel. Here are a few:

Mimulus:

Mimulus is the remedy for any fears or anxieties that you can put a name to. Here are some examples:

  • Fear of being in an unfamiliar place or being unable to speak the language.
  • Fear of ‘foreign’ food.
  • Fear of missing a flight or connection.
  • Fear of driving on the ‘wrong’ side of the road.
  • Fear of getting lost.
  • Fear of terrorists.

Mimulus will give you a sense of ease and that everything is alright.

Fear of flying may be helped by Mimulus, however, it is a complicated condition to treat on your own. I recommend that you get the help of an experienced practitioner who will make a personal blend that is tailor-made to your requirements. Remedies worth considering are: Rock Rose for panic and terror; Cherry Plum for feeling hysterical and trying hard to control things and Willow for getting things out of proportion.

Crab Apple:

This remedy helps with obsessive worries about germs, contaminated food and using public toilets. Crab Apple allows you to be relaxed about your surroundings, even if they seem imperfect. It is also helpful to take to give relief from travel constipation.

Honeysuckle:

Honeysuckle stops that homesickness and longing to be back home when you are only half way through your holiday. It allows you to make the most of the here and now.

Impatiens:

If you hate to stand in line and are constantly clock watching Impatiens will give you patience. You may be obsessed with timetables and become irritable if you think you might be late. You may also have road rage. Your holiday may be spoiled by your constant thoughts about ‘what is next?’

Clematis:

This remedy is wonderful for keeping your mind focused on the here and now. If you have a long road trip to do, Clematis will give you the concentration you need to drive safely. It is designed for people who are ‘day dreamy’ and often drift off into their thoughts or who are absent-minded and ‘not with it’. This is also the remedy for bringing your dreams into fruition. If you have been planning that special trip for years and have collected pictures, made lists and itineraries but haven’t actually booked the ticket, then Clematis will help you to make that trip a reality.

Larch:

If you would love to travel but think ‘I can’t’ or if you make up excuses rather than attempt a trip and make a mess of things. It gives you confidence in your own abilities and the drive to ‘go for it’!

Scleranthus:

Scleranthus helps with seasickness and vertigo. It also helps if you are indecisive and swing between two options – camping or hotel, countryside or beach, train or plane and so on.

Red Chestnut:

This remedy helps if you worry about your family members travelling and think that bad things will happen to them. It will help you to radiate positive encouragement to those you love rather than fear.

Centaury:

Centaury helps you to be assertive and stand up for yourself. If you are being offered a different hotel room to the one you booked or if a meal is not up to scratch, then this remedy will help you to quietly but firmly assert yourself.

Elm:

Planning a trip can become arduous and it easy to get bogged down by the many things that need to be done. Even strong, capable people can suddenly become overwhelmed by all the arrangements, lose confidence and feel that it is all too much. Elm takes away the feeling of overwhelm and restores confidence. It also helps you to delegate so that you are able to do what you can in the time you have available.

Walnut:

Walnut helps you to cope with change and adapt to new circumstances and new surroundings.

Beech:

Holidays often bring out the cracks in family relationships. It is easy to feel critical and intolerant when holidays force us to be together 24/7. If you become irritated by the habits and mannerisms of family members, or if they seem to be doing everything ‘wrong’, then Beech will give you the tolerance and acceptance you need to survive the holiday.

Rescue Remedy and Rescue Cream:

These are travel essentials. Rescue Remedy helps for the stress of travel days and if things go wrong on the trip. The cream is brilliant for soothing rashes, grazes, bites and stings.

All you have to do is choose the remedies that best suit you or your family members. You can safely mix up to 7 remedies together to make your personal travel blend. I would recommend that you start to take your blend at least a month before travelling so that you are perfectly in balance when you are on your trip. Bon voyage!