Hangzhou Travel – Solitary Hill

Of all the travel spots commonly listed in Hangzhou, the Solitary Hill is the only one actually on the lake itself. Unlike the other travel spots, you do not need to buy a ticket to see Solitary Hill, there are no opening times and you can include it in your walk around West Lake.

The Facts

The hill stands alone on the lake surrounded by water so it was called Solitary Hill. It is also a place of solitude for ancient poets and scholars.

The peak of the hill is 38 meters above sea level and easily scaled making Solitary Hill more of an island with a bump than a real hill. It is the only natural island in West Lake.

Points of Interest

There is (to me) no one particular point of interest there that stands out as a must see. There are a number of points that are worth visiting as you make your way round the island.

Ancient Palaces – This part of Hangzhou was the home of three ancient imperial palaces. Emperor Lizhong of the Southern Song Dynasty (1127-1279) Emperors Kangxi and Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911) had their palaces on Solitary Hill. You can see the foundations of these palaces as you walk around the island and some of the older foundations have been enclosed in protective display cases.

Tomb of Qiu Jin – Qiu Jin was a famous female revolutionary at the end of the Qing Dynasty. Qiu Jin was a member of a revolutionary society dedicated to the overthrow of the corrupt Manchu government. She was caught and beheaded in 1907, only 5 years before the formation of the Republic of China in 1912.

Lin Bu’s Tomb – Lin Bu is one of the well known poets of the Northern Song Dynasty (960-1227) who chose to live at Solitary Hill in isolation. Ironically he was a poet of the reclusive school/field of poetry.

Crane Pavilion – Also called the Tending Crane Pavilion. Lin Heqing, a famous poet from the Song Dynasty lived in seclusion at Solitary Hill where he tended plum trees and a crane. The Crane Pavilion was built in his memory.

Getting There

Solitary Hill is located at the northern end of West Lake and can be accessed from the eastern side by Bai Cause Way and from the western side by a bridge near the Temple of General Yue Fei and near the beginning of the Su Causeway.

You can ride onto the island and access most parts by bike and there are bike stations at the causeway entrance. You can also catch the K7, 81 and 850 public buses and the Y9 tourist bus.

Wine Travel – Alabama’s New Wine Trail

If you’ve ever felt that wine travel is best suited for summer time, perhaps by the end of this travelogue you’ll have a slightly different perspective. It’s January as we write this, and winter has its usual vice grip on the Midwest. But all around the country, wineries are welcoming visitors and hosting wine trail events. Actually, the traditional off season is the perfect time to visit your favorite winery. Crowds are lighter and chances are you’ll rub elbows with the owner or winemaker who can personally provide insight into their craft. It’s an ideal way to learn more about wine in a relaxed, leisurely setting.

In spring 2008, we caught wind of a new wine trail being developed and marketed in the Deep South. And so, in an effort to escape the winter doldrums, we set out for the milder climate of Alabama to discover the burgeoning Alabama Wine Trail.

The Alabama Wine Trail: Background and Challenges

Although Alabama isn’t typically known as a wine producing state, there is a long history of grape production and wine making here. Like other southern states, the muscadine grape reigns supreme, but Alabama winemakers are developing a surprising array of excellent wines. Much of north central Alabama offers a mountainous terrain, with numerous opportunities for outdoor recreation. Of course, where there are mountains, there are sure to be valleys. This, combined with a long growing season, gives the Alabama wine industry an excellent opportunity to thrive as time goes on.

Wine Trails USA was delighted to see Alabama designate an official wine trail. If you’re interested, be sure to request an Alabama Wine Trail brochure from the Alabama Travel Council. It’s a beautiful brochure outlining Alabama’s eight wineries, all within an easy drive from the state’s three main cities of Birmingham, Montgomery, and Mobile.

There was, however, a large amount of publicity devoted to the Alabama Wine Trail at its launch, unfortunately not all positive. Long standing anti alcohol biases are quite prevalent in the state, and wineries have overcome numerous hurdles to open for business, let alone market their products. Fortunately, through a lot of hard work and persistence, the Alabama Wine Trail is open for business and capitalizing on the wine travel and agri tourism trend. We’re rooting hard for the success of Alabama wineries and their wine trail, and we hope our visit and this travelogue helps open a few eyes.

Alabama Wineries – East of Birmingham

We chose Birmingham as our base of operations for two nights since four of Alabama’s wineries are situated within a 45 minute drive east of the city. Interstate 20 cuts east/west across Alabama and intersect with Interstate 59 just northwest of Birmingham. Either route will take you into a hilly, almost mountainous, terrain that’s home to Alabama wineries.

Our first winery to visit was Wills Creek Vineyards, just a short distance off Interstate 59 exit 188 in the small town of Attala. Arriving just after 10 a.m. on a crisp but sunny day, we had the winery tasting room all to ourselves. Wills Creek specializes in muscadine wines with interesting twists, as some are dry and others the more traditional sweet.

We enjoyed just about everything we tried, especially the terrific Sirano Limited Release. This bold red wine, similar to a Syrah, is moderately dry with flavors of dark fruit – we tasted plum and blackberry. Also, don’t miss Blazing Sun Pinot Grigio, a friendly white wine with pleasing citrus flavors. We bought a few bottles of this to take home, our very first Alabama wine purchase!

The winery itself is located in the midst of the Duck Valley Wildlife Preserve, and the grounds are pleasant and peaceful. Stop for a few moments and breathe in the fresh air … it’s almost as refreshing as the wine!

Just a few miles south of Wills Creek is White Oak Vineyards, in Anniston just north of Interstate 20. Open on Friday afternoons and Saturdays, White Oak boasts a beautiful tranquil farm setting amidst the rolling hills of central Alabama. Here you’ll enjoy an eclectic variety of twelve wines, ranging from sweet to crisp, all made with Alabama pride. Surprisingly, we found a Chambourcin and also a Burgundy, with the Burgundy made from Norton grapes. Reflecting on last year’s trip to Missouri, we noted the terrain is quite similar in this part of Alabama. The Burgundy in particular was outstanding, with bold intense flavors that to us stacked up against any other Burgundy we’ve tasted.

You should also try White Oak’s fruit wines, especially the Peach. This is such a fun, easy sipper and it’s a real taste of Alabama, as the state is known for its peach crop almost as much as neighboring Georgia. On the drier side, there’s Villard Blanc, an elegant white offering that also made its way home with us.

Alabama Wineries – Day Two

About 35 minutes southeast of Birmingham in Harpersville, AL is Morgan Creek Vineyards, a state of the art winery producing a wide range of wines. Ranging from dry to very sweet, Morgan Creek’s wines are made with fruit and various grape varieties, including the muscadine grape. A stalwart of the south, the muscadine grape is generally quite sweet but are also a perfect blend with fruit and other grapes.

We sampled most of Morgan Creek’s wines and came away most impressed with three in particular. First in our hearts was Noble, a dry red offering with a unique finish of strawberry and dark cherry. We’d serve this one room temperature as a partner to a mild cheese or a strip steak. Next, we liked Cahaba White, just slightly sweet with a bit of a spicy palate mixing well with the fruit. Finally, Regal Red, in the burgundy style and brimming with dark cherry flavors.

In summer, Morgan Creek offers fireworks displays in conjunction with live music nights. You can bring a picnic, enjoy wine tasting, and listen to music under the stars, all capped off by a rousing fireworks show.

Our final winery in this chapter of our Alabama Wine Trail travelogue takes us to Bryant Vineyards in Talladega. If that name sounds familiar, it’s due to the famous Talladega Speedway that draws thousands of visitors each year. Bryant Vineyards is just a few miles away from the track.

Bryant Vineyards has been producing wine since 1985, with grapes grown on land that has been in the Bryant family since the late 1800’s. You’ll find a full range of muscadine wines here, including our favorite, Country White. This is a perfect wine for warm summer nights, or cold January nights for that matter! We also liked Festive Red, a dark red table wine that we felt benefitted from a slight chill.

Bryant is a small operation with no website at press time, so be sure to call ahead to make sure someone is available to greet you.

In closing, we encourage you to get your wine travel “fix” in some of the southern states during the winter months. Travel is easy as temperatures stay above freezing for the most part. And, you won’t need to fight the crowds while you linger at unique small wineries and discover interesting cities and sights along the way.

Tips for Staying Healthy While Traveling

To stay healthy while traveling the immune system must be strong before it is subjected to many air borne viruses. Travel plans alone can cause large amounts of stress on the body, causing it to become weak. The best defense against sickness is to prepare the body for a strong immune system. Below are helpful tips to keep you healthy before, during and after your traveling adventures.

Sleep is one of the biggest ways that people can protect themselves from viral attacks. The immune system becomes weak when sleep is deprived from the body and healthy cells become slower to repair. Sleeping a full eight hours per night is recommended for reaching a maximum level of health. Resting or taking a nap also lets the mind unwind from a stressful day, increasing its strength to tell the body when to fight. Try this during your trip as well.

Fruits and vegetables are a great source of antioxidant power. Antioxidants destroy the cells that make us sick. Eat these before and during your trip and to keep the urge to select junk food when you’re on the go. The highest level of antioxidants found in fruits include: raisins, blueberries, blackberries, strawberries, raspberries, plums, oranges, red grapes and cherries. Vegetables include: kale, spinach, brussel sprouts, alfalfa sprouts, broccoli flowers, beets, red bell peppers, onions, corn and eggplant.

When overseas avoid raw fruit and vegetables, try to bring your own, or wash them with tap water as the food and water may be contaminated. Also, avoid raw or undercooked meat, poultry and eggs and dairy products from small independent vendors.

Staying hydrated by drinking lots of water is also an important way to stay healthy. Drinking caffeine and alcohol rob the body of hydration, so it best to leave these agents out of the picture. Being dehydrated causes the body to act sluggish and toxins need to stay flushed out of the system. Again, be careful of the water when traveling overseas. Bring water to a boil before drinking it. Buying bottled or canned is fine as well as treated water with commercial iodine or chlorine tablets.

Exercise is very beneficial for keeping an optimum state of health. It keeps your energy level up as well as your spirit and helps people to sleep better at night. Bring a fitness DVD or a small pack of work out tools and make sure to get out to tour the city. When reserving a hotel get one with a pool or a gym to stay active and your metabolism level high.

Vaccinations are a good way to keep from contracting diseases, especially from overseas. Mosquito repellent and bug sprays also help lessen the chance of infections. If you are sleeping outside try using a mosquito net around your bed as a tent. Keeping your hands washed or sanitized help keep from spreading germs. Bring a bottle of sanitizer or hand wipes with you. Also, have a blood test and stool analysis upon returning home to make sure that you have not contracted anything serious.